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Recommended Foods To Eat During Winter

CHRONIC INFLAMMATION

The body has all kinds of wonderful mechanisms to protect, repair, and heal itself. Inflammation is one such mechanism. In many cases, it is intended to help us. Consider, for example, a cut on your finger that is slightly igniting. Your body is working hard to counteract all unwanted bacteria and the area becomes warm. You can also wear a hoodie jacket like JUICE WRLD HOODIE to warm your body. However, if your body is not well balanced just after the holidays and you have indulged yourself considerably with alcohol, there is a good chance that you will get inflammation where you do not want it and also inflammation that may become chronic. Chronic inflammation is the basis of many Western diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, rheumatism and can make you tired and suffer from joint pain. And you guessed it, but what we eat is essential for controlling inflammation. For starters, you should avoid or reduce the following foods:

  • sugar and everything that contains sugar
  • salty products
  • processed foods
  • fried foods
  • Red meat

In our current diet, we consume an overdose of omega-6 (anti-inflammatory) is not enough omega-3 (anti-inflammatory) Both polyunsaturated fatty acids are useful, but the ratio is not good for almost everyone. So after avoiding or at least cutting back on all of the above foods, you should eat more of the foods that are anti-inflammatory:

  • Fatty fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines, eel)
  • fruit
  • vegetable
  • sprouts
  • drink water

Most of us do just fine as long as the weather is nice outside, the sun is shining, and eating a green salad doesn’t sound like a punishment. In winter, it’s a different story, but even in winter, there are a number of vegetables that do their best to get you healthier. Add these five winter vegetables to your menu more often and you are well on your way.

KALE
Not for nothing called a home-grown superfood. It is rich in calcium, magnesium, fiber, is full of vitamins A, C and K. And is a winner when it comes to fighting free radicals in your body. You can add kale to salads, soups, stews, or to your green smoothie. Please note that some people suffer from raw kale. So see if your body can handle that.

BROCCOLI
One of my favorite green vegetables. Lots of fiber (especially in the stem), vitamins B and C. Magnesium, and folic acid. Eating a lot of fiber in your diet has been shown to reduce inflammation in your body. So broccoli is a great fit for your diet, especially in winter. You can eat broccoli raw, in soup, stir-fries, salads, or steam or roast with some olive oil and salt.

ARUGULA
Arugula is an annual plant from the finial family, with which it is related to broccoli and cauliflower. Just to name a few. Funny because that’s not what you expect I guess. Arugula is full of antioxidants, making it a nice addition to your meal to fight free radicals. Arugula is a bitter plant, which also means that it supports the liver. Arugula is usually eaten raw in salads, but you can also add it to hot dishes at the end of the preparation time.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS
My most hated vegetable when I was a child, but now I have learned to appreciate Brussels sprouts for the fine cabbage that it is. Brussels sprouts are full of fiber and are vitamin C bombs. Like broccoli, Brussels sprouts contain glucosinolates, an antioxidant group that is powerful as a liver protector and anti-inflammatory.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH
Pumpkin is by far one of my favorite winter vegetables. I literally put it in everything. This is convenient because pumpkin is full of vitamins A and C. And also full of fiber. Pumpkin is delicious as additions to stews, soups, or roasts.